Anti-covid decontamination lamp - PE Energy Solutions
16635
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-16635,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-13.3,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_top,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.0.5,vc_responsive

The first Far-UVC 222nm anti-Covid decontamination lamp

anti-Covid decontamination lamp

The first Far-UVC 222nm anti-Covid decontamination lamp

The First Far-UVC 222nm lamp to be installed in a high street retail store in the next three weeks.

PE Energy and UEC Energy are to install the first Far-UVC 222nm anti-Covid decontamination lamp into a high street retailer later this month. This will be our first of several installs due to take place in March in the UK making this store the first to be Covid19 safe.

Far-UVC 222nm anti-covid decontamination lamp by continuously decontaminating a work area by killing both airborne and surface viruses and pathogens including Covid19.

Customers are ten safes in the knowledge that they are able to shop safe in the knowledge that the chance of contracting Covid19 have been reduced by over 95% in comparison to a shop without our Far-UVC lamp.

To find out more call us on 01394 825933 or contact us

Introduction

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported in December 2019 and then characterized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. Despite extensive efforts to contain the spread of the disease, it has spread worldwide with over 5.3 million confirmed cases and over 340,000 confirmed deaths as of May 25, 2020. Transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the beta coronavirus causing COVID-19, is believed to be both through direct contact and airborne routes, and studies of SARS-CoV-2 stability have shown viability in aerosols for at least 3 hours Given the rapid spread of the disease, including through asymptomatic carriers, it is of clear importance to explore practical mitigation technologies that can inactivate the airborne virus in public locations and thus limit airborne transmission.

Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is a direct antimicrobial approach and its effectiveness against different strains of airborne viruses has long been established. The most commonly employed type of UV light for germicidal applications is a low-pressure mercury-vapour arc lamp, emitting around 254 nm; more recently xenon lamp technology has been used, which emits a broad UV spectrum. However, while these lamps can be used to disinfect unoccupied spaces, direct exposure to conventional germicidal UV lamps in occupied public spaces is not possible since direct exposure to these germicidal lamp wavelengths can be a health hazard, both to the skin and eye. Source: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-67211-2